Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://rportal.lib.ntnu.edu.tw:80/handle/20.500.12235/84845
Title: Different Types of Protean Career Attitude, Task Performance and Contextual Performance: Based on Briscoe and Hall's Model
Different Types of Protean Career Attitude, Task Performance and Contextual Performance: Based on Briscoe and Hall's Model
Authors: 林怡君
Yi-Chun Lin
尹雅
Enkhbayar Tumurbaatar
Keywords: types of protean career attitude
task performance
contextual performance
types of protean career attitude
task performance
contextual performance
Issue Date: 2017
Abstract: Global market change and become more competitive. Recent studies showed that modern careers expected to use adaptive, proactive and self-managed approaches to deal with uncertain environment (Waters, Briscoe, Hall,& Wang, 2014). Therefore, protean career attitude is important for employees to survive this challenging work environment. People with protean career attitude do not bond their careers to an organization (Waters et al., 2014). They experience superior responsibility for their career selection and opportunities, and value their own freedom, growth and development as a success (Chin & Rasdi, 2014). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among the types of protean career attitude, and task and contextual performance. A further subsidiary aim was to investigate the “Protean” type of protean career attitude and its task and contextual performance comparing with the other three types of protean career attitude Dependent, Rigid and Reactive. Using a quantitative approach, online and paper-based questionnaires were conducted and collected in this study. The sample was 302 employees from Mongolia. IBM SPSS 23, and SPSS AMOS 23 were used for data analysis. The result of this study show that the “Dependent” and “Protean” types of protean career attitude have significant, positive correlation with task and contextual performance. The results also showed that “Protean” type has significantly higher task performance and significantly higher contextual performance than Dependent and Rigid types, but not significantly higher than Reactive type
Global market change and become more competitive. Recent studies showed that modern careers expected to use adaptive, proactive and self-managed approaches to deal with uncertain environment (Waters, Briscoe, Hall,& Wang, 2014). Therefore, protean career attitude is important for employees to survive this challenging work environment. People with protean career attitude do not bond their careers to an organization (Waters et al., 2014). They experience superior responsibility for their career selection and opportunities, and value their own freedom, growth and development as a success (Chin & Rasdi, 2014). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among the types of protean career attitude, and task and contextual performance. A further subsidiary aim was to investigate the “Protean” type of protean career attitude and its task and contextual performance comparing with the other three types of protean career attitude Dependent, Rigid and Reactive. Using a quantitative approach, online and paper-based questionnaires were conducted and collected in this study. The sample was 302 employees from Mongolia. IBM SPSS 23, and SPSS AMOS 23 were used for data analysis. The result of this study show that the “Dependent” and “Protean” types of protean career attitude have significant, positive correlation with task and contextual performance. The results also showed that “Protean” type has significantly higher task performance and significantly higher contextual performance than Dependent and Rigid types, but not significantly higher than Reactive type
URI: http://etds.lib.ntnu.edu.tw/cgi-bin/gs32/gsweb.cgi?o=dstdcdr&s=%22http://etds.lib.ntnu.edu.tw/cgi-bin/gs32/gsweb.cgi?o=dstdcdr&s=id=%22G060486023I%22.&%22.id.&
http://rportal.lib.ntnu.edu.tw:80/handle/20.500.12235/84845
Other Identifiers: G060486023I
Appears in Collections:學位論文

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