Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://rportal.lib.ntnu.edu.tw:80/handle/77345300/79803
Title: 課程目標認同傾向與教學計畫之探討
The Identification Tendency towards Curriculum Goals and Instruction Planning
Other Titles: 以「健康與體育」學習領域第一學習階段為例
he Health and Physical Education Learning Area for the First Learning Level
Authors: 國立臺灣師範大學體育學系
廖智倩
闕月清
Issue Date: 1-Sep-2006
Publisher: 中華民國大專院校體育總會
Abstract: The purpose of instruction planning was to help teachers to consider the implementation of teaching. Both of these had a great impact on teaching. This study investigated the discrepancies between identification tendency towards curriculum goals and instruction planning in the "Health and Physical Education Learning Area", and the influential factors which caused the discrepancies. The participants of this study included 8 elementary teachers. Data collection included the Q-sort method, interviews and documents. The results were as follows. First, the top three precedences of the identification tendency towards curriculum goals were sports participation, growth development, humans and food. The lowest three precedences of the identification tendency towards curriculum goals were group health, sports skills and safe life. Second, the discrepancies of the identification tendency towards curriculum goals and instruction planning were affected by students, teachers, school administration, field and equipment, school community and others. Based on these findings, teacher's identification tendency towards the curriculum goals would directly affect their instruction planning. Therefore, the understanding of the differences between identification tendency towards curriculum goals and instruction planning could be used as a reference for teacher professional development and education administrative unit.
URI: http://rportal.lib.ntnu.edu.tw/handle/77345300/79803
ISSN: 1563-3470
Other Identifiers: ntnulib_tp_F0108_01_013
Appears in Collections:教師著作

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