Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://rportal.lib.ntnu.edu.tw:80/handle/77345300/32959
Title: How Benefits and Challenges of Personal Response System Impact Students’ Continuance Intention? A Taiwanese Context. (conditional acceptance)
Authors: 國立臺灣師範大學國際人力資源發展研究所
Yeh, C.R.
Tao, Y.
Issue Date: 1-May-2012
Publisher: International Forum of Educational Technology and Society
Abstract: To address four issues observed from the latest Personal Response System (PRS) review by Kay and LeSage (2009), this paper investigates, through a systematic research, how the derived benefits and challenges of PRS affect the satisfaction and continuance intention of college students in Taiwan. The empirical study samples representative college students enrolled in three universities from each of the Northern, Central, Southern, and Eastern geographical regions in Taiwan. The results based on 406 valid returned questionnaires and partial least square analysis confirm that classroom environment and learning benefits have positive effects, whereas technology- and student-based challenges have negative effects on student satisfaction, thus influencing their intention to continue using PRS. In contrast, assessment benefits and teacher-based challenges do not have significant influences on student satisfaction. The present research contributes to literature by empirically testing PRS benefits and challenges derived from previous works, validating only the aspects that influence student satisfaction and, consequently, their behavioral intention to continue using PRS. The implications and suggestions derived from this rigorous research are highly relevant in practice. The findings enable a set of general design strategies for successful PRS implementations, providing the empirical basis for conducting future in-depth PRS research.
URI: http://rportal.lib.ntnu.edu.tw/handle/77345300/32959
ISSN: 1176-3647
Other Identifiers: ntnulib_tp_H0304_01_003
Appears in Collections:教師著作

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